Call for Works

We want to publish your work. Do you have a project that you think would look really sweet on The Expanded Environment? Are you interested in biology, architecture, ecology urbanism, interspecies art and various combinations thereof?

Do you have a project that you think would look really sweet on The Expanded Environment? Are you interested in biology, architecture, ecology urbanism, interspecies art and various combinations thereof? We here at The Expanded Environment are always looking for exciting new content in a diverse range of topics from animal art, to bio-architecture to urban agriculture and wildly ecologically sensitive human habitations. We’ll take a look at all types of work — built and unbuilt — we just insist that the work reflect our core-values of learning to design with biology. If this is your first time to the site check out some of the previous featured projects and past posts. Also be sure to read our about page. And most of all, thank you for your submission!

Submit a short description of the project, 1-5 jpgs (600 pixel width max) and drawings to: expandedenvironment@gmail.com

We promise that an impartial jury will select only the best projects and all projects chosen will be notified prior to posting.

-The Expanded Environment

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