DesignGood Review

http://designgood.com/animal-architecture/
The good works of Animal Architecture has recently been recognized by the kind folks at DesignGood. DesignGood is an online community that shares the stories of the people, products and organizations making an impact around the globe through creativity and contribution.

The good works of Animal Architecture has recently been recognized by the kind folks at DesignGood. DesignGood is an online community that shares the stories of the people, products and organizations making an impact around the globe through creativity and contribution. DesignGood is where do gooders, go getters, game changers and creative souls go to get inspired by a new breed of individuals who are using creativity, art, design and innovation to create positive social change. They are doing everything from designing fonts to designing clothes, growing gardens to growing education, writing letters to writing books, starting programs to starting movements, all with the sole purpose to help others. We are thrilled to be part of the DesignGood family and recommend checking-out their site for projects that are making the world a better place to live. An excerpted section of the story on Animal Architecture is below but be sure to visit the link below for the full story.

Ned Dodington’s life changed when he fell in love with the Gulf Coast oyster. He was a second year grad student at Rice, and he was asked to design a real estate development solution for Galveston – a prime location for coastal property that struggled with hurricanes and flooding. Ned and his peers developed a wetland eco-resort habitation where oyster reefs would help Galveston maintain its beachfront, prevent coastal erosion, and jumpstart wetland ecologies.

After some time, the Oyster reefs would even help build the foundation for human habitation.

“The idea was that the livelihood of the oyster and the human were inextricably intertwined in the project,” he explains. “The success of the human habitation depended on the success of the oysters. And this was it for me, I was hooked.”

Growing up in New York City, Ned spent most of his summers in Illinois. “I developed this romantic view of farming and agriculture,” he says. For Ned, creating the Oyster Project brought everything together.

Knowing that this was the kind of work he wanted to do, Ned spent the next two years working on projects that engaged other animals and ecological forces.

“I thought of a project to employ a band of roaming goats to help remediate a brownfield site in Monterrey, Mexico,” he explains. “They would help eat and fertilize the ground, as humans would extract the harmful materials from the soil.”

Animal Architecture has displayed approximately 200 projects, they have entered two international competitions, and various award winners were displayed at the Houston Architecture Center…

More from DesignGood and about Animal Architecture on DesignGood can be found at the link below.

http://designgood.com/animal-architecture/

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